There’s a plan to grow the Catawba reservation in York County. Here’s what it’ll take

Catawba Indian artist Alex Osborn starts residency at Native American Studies

Catawba Indian Nation artist Alex Osborn will start his residency at the University of South Carolina Lancaster Center for Native American Studies; exhibit to be displayed in August. By Tracy Kimball captions and subtitles off, selected

Catawba Indian Nation artist Alex Osborn will start his residency at the University of South Carolina Lancaster Center for Native American Studies; exhibit to be displayed in August. By Tracy Kimball The more than 600-acre Catawba Indian Nation reservation in York County may grow a little larger.

York County Council passed the first of three readings needed to expand the reservation. The initial decision was by title only, meaning details haven’t yet been finalized into an ordinance. The title only approach isn’t uncommon. Full details on such decisions then come before second and third reading, and, when required, a public hearing.

The title only decision mentions expansion of the reservation by several listed properties, but also future expansion of land contiguous to the Rock Hill-area reservation as outlined in a federal agreement.

A 1993 federal land claims settlement agreement restored and extended federal rights for the Catawbas. It repealed a prior act from 1959. It provided for expansion of the reservation and conveyed property from the state to the U.S. Bureau of Indian Affairs as trustee. It also made the tribe eligible for gaming, key to the opening earlier this month of a new Kings Mountain, N.C. casino .

That North Carolina project involved almost 17 […]

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